With new hope in their heart India’s first uterus transplant patients heading home

Nearly three weeks have gone by since the first uterus transplant was carried out in Pune. The biopsy test conducted on Tuesday of both the patients confirmed that the organ is accepted by the body and now both the patients will be discharged on Thursday

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After completing three weeks of hospitalisation and under-going medication, India’s uterus transplant patients are on their way home. Speaking exclusively with My Medical Mantra, the first uterus transplant who hailed from Solapur said, “There is no pain now and I am all excited to go home. I will come for the rechecking after three weeks.”

A woman from Baroda aged 24 who suffered from Asherman’s Syndrome and who was the second to undergo the surgery, said, “I am absolutely normal. The only precaution which I will have to take is of not to catch any infection. Though the option of surrogacy was available, I did not want that. I wanted my own biological child. I hope everything works in my favour in future.”

Nearly three weeks have gone by since the first uterus transplant was carried out in Pune. The biopsy test conducted on Tuesday of both the patients confirmed that the organ is accepted by the body and now both the patients will be discharged on Thursday.

Giving an update on the patient’s progress, director of Galaxy Care Laparoscopy Institute (GCLI), Shailesh Puntambekar, said, “The biopsy test is completely normal and the organ is not rejected by the patient. It is a great moment for us. The patients will now be discharged tomorrow.”

Meanwhile the hospital has received 90 applicants for the transplant. Puntambekar said, “Almost 50 per cent of those who are on waiting list are not married. Today, a lady from Chandigarh called me and said that her husband has served her a divorce notice, but is ready to take it back as she wants to undergo the transplant. There are many such willing women who are approaching us. It is now for the government to decide whether to allow such transplants for those who are not married. Since the surgery is done, it is up to the government now to set up the protocol.”

The surgery was conducted at GCLI following a go-ahead from the state’s Directorate of Health Services. Further the success of womb transplant depends on whether the recipient is able to conceive.