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Vitiligo-skin-condition
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During this event Dr Muralidhar Tambe, Deputy dean, enlightened the audience regarding the cosmetic importance of this disease and the need for further awareness in the society about this disease.

Dr Arun Kowale, spoke about the origin of this day and the history behind the celebration of this day and implored the gathered people comprising of the patients and relatives to put an end to the discrimination and help them lead a normal life.

While Dr Vasudha Belgaonkar, Associate Professor educated the people about the non-infectious nature of the disease and also demonstrated the difference between the leprosy and vitiligo with the help of picture.

She also stressed upon the fact that only in 20-30% cases the disease is inherited and can be passed on to the next generation.  Also, she announced the various advanced medical and surgical modalities available at the Sassoon General Hospital and urged the public at large to avail this benefit.

Key vitiligo facts:

  • Vitiligo is a disease in which the pigment cells of the skin, melanocytes, are destroyed in certain areas.
  • Symptoms and signs of vitiligo include loss of skin color in the form of depigmented, or white, patches of skin in any location on the body.
  • Vitiligo can be focal and localized to one area, or it may affect several different areas on the body.
  • The exact cause of vitiligo is unknown, although most experts believe that it is an autoimmune condition in which the body’s immune system mistakenly attacks and destroys certain cells within the body.
  • Most people who have vitiligo will develop the condition prior to age 40; about half develop it before age 20.
  • Vitiligo may have a genetic component, as the condition tends to run in families.
  • Vitiligo is sometimes associated with other medical conditions, including thyroid dysfunction.
  • There is no way to determine if vitiligo will spread or remain confined to one location.
  • Vitiligo is not painful and does not have significant health consequences; however, it can have emotional and psychological consequences.
  • Some medical treatments can reduce the severity of the condition, but it can be difficult to cure.

This occasion was graced by presence of Deputy Dean Dr Muralidhar Tambe, UG Dean Dr Arun Kowale, Professor and Head Dr Ravindranath B Chavan, Associate Professor Dr Vasudha Belgaonkar and Dr Anil P. Gosavi.

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