WCNR 2018: ‘There is an increasing interest in literature related to neuromyopathy’

On the third day of the 10th World Congress for Neuro Rehabilitation (WCNR) 2018, Dr Dana Boering highlighted about neuromyopathy and sepsis in her talk. In a session chaired by Dr Boering, Dr Satish Khadilkar, Dr Sarosh M Katrak, experts take us through key concepts in neuromyopathy

WCNR 2018: ‘There is an increasing interest in literature related to neuromyopathy’

On the third day of the 10th World Congress for Neuro Rehabilitation (WCNR) 2018, Dr Dana Boering,  Senior physician of Neurology, Specialist in neurology and rehabilitation, SRH health Centre highlighted about neuromyopathy and sepsis in her talk. She explained the concepts to the delegates at the event.

Neuromyopathy is a combination of neural damage and muscle degeneration in patients requiring prolonged critical care, mostly in a background of multiple organ failure and inflammation, often due to gram-negative sepsis.

Sepsis is the presence in tissues of harmful bacteria and their toxins, typically through infection of a wound. It is the body’s overwhelming and life-threatening response to infection that can lead to tissue damage, organ failure, and death. In other words, it’s your body’s over active and toxic response to an infection.

“Increasing number of people suffering from severe sepsis means decreasing number of people wanting intensive care. Neuromyopathy is a striking clinical condition related with a bad chance of survival. This weakness is associated with prolonged whinnings from the respiration and less probable possibility to go back home and have a normal living,” said Dr Dana Boering, Senior physician of Neurology, Specialist in neurology and rehabilitation, SRH health Centre.

“There is an increasing interest in literature related to neuromyopathy and hence, my session is focusing about it. The subject of neuromyopathy is controversial. There is a lot more to discuss in the field of neuromyopathy.

India in particular has a wide amount of people surviving serious illnesses and this is the issue that has preoccupied the sub-continent. And with such conferences, a lot seems to be positive,” added Dr Boering.

“Some myopathic conditions can result in severe generalised as well as respiratory muscle weakness, requiring admission to the ICU,” said Dr Satish Khadilkar, Professor and Head of Department of Neurology, Bombay Hospital Institute of Medical Sciences, Mumbai.

He added, “The diagnostic categories are many and knowledge of the clinical presentations and investigative profile is important. Early diagnosis and appropriate management of these disorders reduces morbidity and mortality.”