Unable to pass stool? Do not ignore as it may not be constipation

A three-year-long survey done by a Mumbai hospital found 42 per cent patients had obstructed defecation syndrome (ODS) which is the inability to pass stool through digestive tract and out the rectum, this is often mistaken for constipation

OCD
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Struggling to pass stools is often passed off as problem related with constipation, but a three-year-long survey done by a Mumbai hospital says otherwise. The survey found 42 per cent patients had obstructed defecation syndrome (ODS) which is the inability to pass stool through the digestive tract and out the rectum, this is often mistaken for constipation, said doctors.

ODS is often misunderstood as constipation and therefore ignored. Unlike constipation, in ODS, there is an urge to pass stool and the person tries to push. People use laxatives to solve an ODS issue,” said Dr Roy Patankar, Gastroenterologist and Director of Zen Hospital.

He added that, in the survey, they found, women are more prone to this syndrome than men. “In our study, we found, 2/3rd of the ODS patients were women. The age group of women getting ODS is 40-65. This is because they undergo multiple deliveries or childbirth,” said Patankar.

The findings of this survey were unveiled at the Ano-rectal meet conducted at Hyatt Regency on Sunday.

Patankar further said that, earlier middle aged women were commonly affected but in the last few years, a younger age group of women is also facing this. “In ODS, the rectum muscles become weak, making it difficult to pass stool. Patients often rely on home remedies. Many considered it to be a psychological condition,” he said.

He said it is found that around 10 per cent of piles patients actually had ODS. “15 per cent of ODS patient undergo surgery.  The rest can be managed by pelvic floor exercise, bio feedback medication and good dietary habits like drinking plenty of fluids and eating high fibre diet etc.,” said Patankar.