Terrified by assaults, doctors lose trust in administration, govt machinery

After the horrifying incidents in Dhule, Nashik and rest of Maharashtra, where medical professionals were assaulted by an angry mob, doctors are now openly voicing concerns about their safety

Members of Maharashtra Association of Resident Doctors (MARD) protest against the attack on a resident doctor in Dhule Civil Hospital in Mumbai on March 17 Image courtesy: Bhushan Koyande / MMM
Members of Maharashtra Association of Resident Doctors (MARD) protest against the attack on a resident doctor in Dhule Civil Hospital, in Mumbai on March 17 Image courtesy: Bhushan Koyande / MMM
  • Nashik: (March 16): Intern Dr Rahul Patil and a nurse were beaten up
  • Dhule (March 12): Dr Rohan Mhamunkar was assaulted
  • Shirpur: Earlier this week a doctor’s clinic was ransacked
  • Latur: (January 18) Intern doctor was assaulted

After the horrifying incidents in Dhule, Nashik and rest of Maharashtra, where medical professionals were assaulted by an angry mob, doctors are now openly voicing concerns about their safety.

Doctors say they don’t have much faith on the administrative system and the government machinery. Doctors say while attending to a patient, they are left with only god’s mercy, as there is no one to protect them.

Speaking to My Medical Mantra, an intern doctor, said, “We don’t feel safe while working in casualty, as the atmosphere is not conducive. We can’t work in a hostile environment. When we see a mob approaching with a patient, only one concern occupies our mind – what if we are assaulted? Who will save us?”

Dr Sagar Mundada, Youth Wing Chairman, Indian Medical Association (IMA), Maharashtra, said, “When we became doctors, we were taught ‘do no harm’. Now, the time has come when we should teach patients, don’t harm us and don’t stop us from doing our duties.”

Terrified by assaults, doctors lose trust in administration, government machinery
Dr Bipin Pandit, Chairperson of Violence Against Doctors, The Federation of Obstetric and Gynecological Societies of India (FOGSI), and umbrella body of gynaecologists in India, said, “For the first time I am happy that none of my children took up medicine. The resident doctors work very hard. They don’t eat and sleep properly as they are always busy in serving the patients. In the end, this is the reward they are getting for doing their duty towards the nation. If incidents like Dhule continue, then young generation will be scared to pursue medicine.”