Ready to work in rural areas? DMER proposes 10% quota in medical colleges

The state has been facing shortage of doctors in rural areas. Owing to which, The Directorate of Medical Education and Research (DMER) have forwarded the proposal to the state’s medical education ministry. As per the proposal, 250 medical seats will be exclusively reserved for these medical students

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Soon, the state medical education department will be reserving 10 per cent of the medical seats in its medical colleges for students who agree to serve 10 years of compulsory service in rural Maharashtra.

The Directorate of Medical Education and Research (DMER) have forwarded the proposal to the state’s medical education ministry.

“It is a different model. The proposal has been put forward to the medical education ministry and legal opinion will be taken from the law and judiciary department,” said Dr Pravin Shingare, director, DMER.

DMER controls and regulates the administration of government medical colleges and hospitals along with government dental colleges and hospitals. It also controls and regulates urban and rural health centres attached to these institutions.

As per the proposal, 250 medical seats will be exclusively reserved for these medical students.  “A separate list will be made for these students. We have taken Medical Council of India into consideration. These doctors will only serve in rural Maharashtra for 10 years,” said Dr Shingare.

The state has been facing shortage of doctors in rural areas. In the last month, the DMER had issued a notice where they instructed the Maharashtra Medical Council (MMC) not to renew the registration of the doctors who have failed to submit a bond-free certificate to them. The notices clarified that such doctors will be treated as bogus doctors and are liable to action under the Maharashtra Medical Profession Act, 196.

A doctor who has completed their graduation / post-graduation / super speciality / degree / diploma from government-run or Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation (BMC)-run medical colleges, have to serve either a bond or have pay Rs 10 lakhs to the government.  However, it is found that many of these students manage to dodge the bonded services without paying the fines.