Prevention of blindness in preterm infants key focus at Indian ROP conference

‘Indian ROP (iROP) Society’ was founded in 2016 in Bangalore by different ROP specialists from the country. The society claims that a major problem in improving screening coverage is shortage of ROP specialists. India annually records the highest number of births in the world, 3.5 million (35 lakhs). Around 1 lakh babies need ROP screening in the absence of screening facilities, particularly in smaller cities and towns, otherwise they are likely to turn blind without intervention

Prevention of blindness in preterm infants key focus at Indian ROP conference

In a bid to fix its strategy for lowering the number of children affected with Retinopathy of Prematurity (ROP), the Indian Retinopathy of Prematurity Society will be hosting its second national annual meet in Pune.

The Indian ROP (iROP) Society claims that when the survival rate of preterm babies in India is increasing, the occurrence of ROP in them is also rising. It further states that there are not enough screening facilities to check ROP’s in neonatal kids.

Retinopathy of Prematurity (ROP) is a disease occurring in preterm babies born below 2 kg of weight. This can cause permanent blindness in these babies if not screened or treated on time. The conference will be hosted at H V Desai Eye Hospital in Pune on July 22.

Prevention of blindness in preterm infants key focus at Indian ROP conference

Dr Sucheta Kulkarni, Medical Directorate of H V Desai Eye Hospital in Pune, who is also one of the specialists in the field of ROP in India, said, “According to recent estimates, every year approximately 3,000 preterm children are turning blind in India and is likely to rise if nothing is done about it. In the conference research papers on ROP’s would be presented by the doctors and new strategies would be discussed on how this disease can be handled so that its occurrence rate reduces. We will also speak about areas in which the future research should be carried out during the conference.”

‘Indian ROP (iROP) Society’ was founded in 2016 in Bangalore by different ROP specialists from the country. The society claims that a major problem in improving screening coverage is shortage of ROP specialists. India annually records the highest number of births in the world, 3.5 million (35 lakhs). Around 1 lakh babies need ROP screening in the absence of screening facilities, particularly in smaller cities and towns, otherwise they are likely to turn blind without intervention.