Mumbai sees second H1N1 death, doctors say nothing to worry

This year, swine flu has been a cause of concern in Maharashtra, especially in Pune, Nashik, Solapur and Aurangabad. So far, the state has registered 196 deaths till May 14

Mumbai sees its first swine flu death of 2017 after a toddler succumbs to it
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Mumbai sees a second swine flu death of the year after a 72-year-old woman from Kurla succumbed to the swine flu (H1N1) infection on May 12.

While confirming the swine flu death, Dr Padmaja Keskar, executive health officer, Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation (BMC) told My Medical Mantra said the patient fell in the high-risk category with high blood pressure and ischemic heart disease (a condition that affects the supply of blood to the heart).

“Senior citizens, children, pregnant women, diabetics or those with hypertension and people whose immunity is compromised need to be careful. We are organising awareness campaigns so that people falling in high-risk category of swine flu approach doctors at the earliest,” said Dr keskar.

Earlier, on April 28, an 18-month-old child had died of swine flu in Mumbai. Doctors however say Mumbaikars need not need worry.

“Swine flu cases in the city are sporadic in nature. We will have to wait and watch if it is a cause of concern in monsoon,” said Dr Vasant Nagwekar, infectious disease expert at Global Hospital.

This year, swine flu has been a cause of concern in Maharashtra, especially in Pune, Nashik, Solapur and Aurangabad. So far, the state has registered 196 deaths till May 14.

“We have been studying the swine flu cases pattern in the state and have observed that almost all the swine flu deaths were related to delayed diagnosis and treatment. If the disease is picked up early, 99% will recover. There is nothing to panic about,” said Dr Pradip Awate, epidemiology in-charge in the state.

Last month, Dr Deepak Sawant, state health minister had held a video conference with all concerned health officers from districts. He had asked all the districts are on high alert.

Dr Om Shrivastav, consultant for infectious diseases, said, “Swine flu is now not restricted to a particular season. To rein swine flu infection, we need to look into the prevention part. Those who are high risk and are living in the areas seeing more swine flu cases should get vaccinated. It will safe guard them from the infection for 12 months.”