MP’s cop who was fat-shamed by Shobhaa De, resumes work after losing 15 kgs

According to doctor Muffazal Lakdawala, in year Jogewat should lose about 80 kgs. They said the surgery and weight loss will help him get a control on his other ailments like diabetes, hypertension, sleep apnea, lymphedema

The Madhya Pradesh cop who was fat-shamed on Twitter resumes work after losing in 15 kilos last two months. In February, author Shobhaa De had ridiculed Daulatram Jogewat on Twitter after which Dr Muffazal Lakdawala, Bariatric Surgeon at Saifee Hospital, Mumbai offered to treat him.

Jogewat weighed around 180 kilos when he was admitted to Saifee hospital on February 27.

Cop who was fat-shamed by Shobha De, undergoes obesity surgery at Saifee hospital
Daulatram Jogewat, the Madhya Pradesh Police Inspector with Dr Muffazal Lakdawala, Bariatric Surgeon, at Saifee Hospital in Mumbai

He underwent laparoscopic gastric banding also known as lap band surgery and was discharged from the hospital. The lap band surgery involves placing a silicone band around the upper part of the stomach to create an hourglass shaped stomach.

“It is a reversible procedure for weight loss. A small outlet is left to allow food to enter into the lower part of the stomach. The band proves to be effective in weight loss as it restricts food intake; moreover, food stays in the stomach for a longer period thus leading to early satiety and decreased consumption of food,” said Lakdawala.

According to the doctor, in a year Jogewat will lose about 80 kgs. They said the surgery and weight loss will help him get a control on his other ailments like diabetes, hypertension, sleep apnea, lymphedema.

Lakdawala’s another famous patient, Eman Ahmed who was once said to be the heaviest woman in the world with a weight of 500kgs- dramatically lost 262 kilos. The Egyptian national was flown to Mumbai on February 11 and underwent bariatric surgery on March 7.  Her genetic test report showed she has a rare gene defect that caused obesity. According to doctors, she will be in hospital for another month before being sent home.

“The operation that she has had may have some beneficial effects but does not deal with the underlying problem,” said Dr Lakdawala.

 He further said new drugs are being developed which may be able to, at least partially, “bypass” the signalling block in her brain. These new drugs may hold some promise but it is too early for these drugs. “If she has access to these drugs and they are effective, we have a solution for her obesity. If not, she may need a more radical surgery which causes malabsorption a little later in life,” said Lakdawala.

Talking the next course of action for Eman, Lakdawala said she will continue to be on strict diet and physiotherapy.