Maharashtra unsafe for doctors? Yet another intern doctor, nurse beaten up in Nashik

Even as doctors across the state are protesting the Dhule incident, yet another intern doctor and a nurse were thrashed by an angry mob on Thursday night in Nashik

Maharashtra unsafe for doctors? Yet another intern thrashed in Nashik
Following the incident at night, Nashik’s Civil Hospital staff, including intern doctors, staged a protest on Friday (March 17). Doctors have shut down the OPD and only emergency surgeries are being carried out

Just within five days after a resident doctor in Dhule was attacked yet another shocking incident surfaced on Thursday night (March 16) when another intern doctor and a nurse at Nashik Civil Hospital were assaulted by an angry mob.

Dr Rahul Patil, in his early twenties, was on duty when a group of people attacked him and a nurse after a patient named Nasir Shah died.

According to police, Shah, a resident of Sangamner (Maharashtra), was a suspected swine flu case and was admitted to Nashik Civil Hospital around 10pm on Thursday.

Nasir was referred to the civil hospital by a private hospital. However, barely 45 minutes after admission, Shah was declared dead.

“After doctors pronounced him dead, relatives started assaulting the doctor and the nurse. They pushed and slapped Patil and the nurse. During the assault, the nurse’s apron was torn,” said Dr GM Holey, Additional Civil Surgeon at Nashik Civil Hospital.

Following the incident at night, Nashik’s Civil Hospital staff, including intern doctors, started a protest on Friday (March 17), affecting the medical services.

Doctors have shut down the OPD and only emergency surgeries are being carried out.

This is the second assault in a week’s time and it has shattered the doctors’ community.

Doctors in Jalgaon too had taken to streets to condemn Dhule attack
Doctors in Jalgaon too had taken to streets to condemn Dhule attack

“The situation in Maharashtra has become scary now as we don’t feel safe. We are doctors, and we are here to save lives, but if this is what we will get in return, then young doctors will not work in their full capacity. We met the collector and police chief and apprised them of our grievances.”

Meanwhile, speaking to My Medical Mantra, police inspector Sitaram Kolhe attached to Sarkarwada police station, said, “We have registered an FIR and investigation is on. We will take appropriate action.”

On March 12, a resident doctor from Dhule, Dr Rohan Mhamunkar, was mercilessly beaten up by an angry mob. Dr Mhamunkar is likely to lose his vision.

With this second attack in a week’s time, one question which crops up inevitably is if doctors are safe in Maharashtra?

If not, then who is responsible for their safety?

  • Sharad N. Tavkar

    The problem with all crimes in India is that we do not have laws to provide deterrent punishment. In all such cases summary trials should be held-avoiding lengthy legal proceedings-CCTV pictures should be considered as conclusive evidence and the criminals should be arrested and sent to jail immediately to serve a long period of imprisonment. But in a country where a large number of Legislative Assembly / Parliament members are criminals,can we expect safety to law abiding citizens?