Maha: Soon,‘Critical Care Course’ for MBBS students in govt colleges

‘Acute Critical Care Course’ is likely to be included in the curriculum of the MBBS in Maharashtra. The Maharashtra University of Health Sciences is considers introducing this course in the MBBS syllabus in government medical colleges

Image source: Google Image for representational purposes only
Image source: Google
Image for representational purposes only

Dr Kalidas Chavan, Registrar of the Maharashtra University of Health Sciences has informed My Medical Mantra about this development.

According to a study, carried out by Harvard University, in 2017, 50 lakh people had died in India, due to medical negligence. Experts believe that a specialised course for the doctors and the hospital staff can cut down the death cases by 50%.

While speaking to My Medical Mantra, Dr Kalidas Chavan, Registrar of the Maharashtra University of Health Sciences said, “Not only the doctors and the hospital staff, common people can also give the basic life support. Critical Care Couse has already been started at the Maharashtra University of Health Sciences. The course has been started as a pilot project. But, soon we are planning to introduce the course in the MBBS curriculum.”

The Harvard study stated that the deaths occur in India as the doctors and the hospital staff are not aware of how to handle critically ill patients.

While speaking to My Medical Mantra, Dr Shivkumar Utture, President of the Maharashtra Medical Council said, “The Critical Care Course is for the doctors and the hospital staff to save lives. The course is already been launched at the Maharashtra University of Health Sciences and it is available in a few private hospitals. But, the course should be included in the medical colleges in the curriculum. So that the students will get information about how to handle the critically ill patients.”

While Dr Ramesh Bharmal, Dean of Mumbai’s civic-run Nair hospital, said, “We have been training doctors and the nursing staff how to handle critically ill patients. We have started a six-month course for the doctors and the staff.”