Good Samaritan: Indore IAS officer organises highest inter-state green corridors, saves 97 lives

Sanjay Dubey, who is (IAS) commissioner, Indore division and Founder of Indore Society for Organ Donation was awarded on the 7th Indian National Organ Donation Day for facilitating 13 green corridors

Driven by his commitment to not let a single organ be wasted, Sanjay Dubey, (IAS) commissioner, Indore division and Founder of Indore Society for Organ Donation, facilitated highest number of inter-state green corridors in the country, which saved 97 lives. He carried out 13 inter-state green corridors

“When I took charge as commissioner of Indore division, the state didn’t have organ donation programme. Organs are precious, but they were getting wasted. We formed a society and roped in hospitals and other stakeholders,” said Dubey.

Sanjay Dubey receiving award on 7th Indian National Organ Donation Day in New Delhi on Wednesday
Sanjay Dubey (third from right) receiving award on 7th Indian National Organ Donation Day in New Delhi on Wednesday

On the 7th Indian National Organ Donation Day held in New Delhi on Wednesday, Union Minister for Health and Family Welfare JP Nadda awarded Dubey, recognising his relentless efforts to save maximum lives by participating in the cadaver donation programme.

A green corridor is a special travel route for speedy transportation of retrieved organs from a brain dead patient.

Speaking with My Medical Mantra over the phone, Dubey said to encourage cadaver donations, his foundation has introduced donor family friendly organ donation programme.

“We have medical insurance for at least two members of donor’s family. We also ensure that donor family gets government scheme benefits apart from medical insurance. It is first of its kind in the country and has helped build people’s confidence in the programme,” said Dubey.

Presently, Madhya Pradesh has kidney transplant programme and plans to start with heart and liver transplant soon. Interestingly, it is the only state in India that transports organs for transplant beyond 500 kilometers.

Dubey informed that with donor family agreeing to donate heart and liver, his foundation decided to have inter-state green corridors too.

“We have been regularly transporting heart for transplant to Mumbai and liver to Delhi and we have been using commercial flights to make it economical,” he said.

Dubey said most challenging part of the entire process is retrieving and transporting organs within four hours. Once a patient is declared brain dead, doctors start working on modalities for transport and coordination.

“As per standard protocol, before organ retrieval, the person has to be certified brain dead by medical professional twice. Gap between the two confirmations has to be six hours. We use this period to coordinate with all stakeholders, which includes Central Industrial Security Force (CISF), airlines, airport authorities, traffic officials and medical professionals. We also select the shortest air route for the transport,” said Dubey.