Fluctuating temperatures put Mumbaikars at risk of throat and respiratory infection

The temperatures during the day are just below the 35°C mark, while the mercury at night falls to 29°C. This fluctuation in temperature has resulted in an increase in respiratory tract infections in the city

Fluctuating temperatures put Mumbaikars at risk of throat and respiratory infection
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City doctors are seeing an increase in the number of patients with throat infection and upper respiratory tract infection.

According to doctors at KEM Hospital, they are seeing many patients who have throat infection, swollen glands and fever. On a daily basis 7 to 8 patients are coming with throat infection.

Preteek Sharma (name changed), 20, is one of them. He is suffering from a throat infection from last few days and was experiencing pain in his throat.

“Due to the pain in my throat, I was finding it difficult to swallow food,” said Sharma who came to KEM Hospital for treatment.

Dr KR Dhebri, General Physician said, “I am getting 20 patients per day from different age groups. Viruses thrive in fluctuating temperatures.”

The mornings are cooler and it gets hot in the afternoons, this helps the microbes to breed. This type of weather is favourable for upper respiratory infection.

The temperatures during the day are just below the 35°C mark, while the mercury at night falls to 29°C. This fluctuation in temperature has resulted in an increase in respiratory tract infections in the city, says Dhebri.

During the month of January and February, the city witnessed record-breaking day temperatures; among this 23rd January was the second-hottest January day in eight years. Whereas 18th February was the second-hottest February day this decade. The second week of February observed maximum temperature between 36 and 38 degrees Celsius.

From March end to first week of April, Mumbai witnessed an unusual increase in minimum temperatures. Both maximum and minimum temperatures were above the normal levels and thanks to increased humidity levels, the weather remained uneasy.

Fluctuating temperatures put Mumbaikars at risk of throat and respiratory infection

“Unhealthy eating habits like consuming junk food, drinking contaminated water, not washing hands before eating. All of this leads to throat or upper respiratory infection,” said Dr Anil Pachnekar, who is President of Indian Medical Association (IMA).

His suggestion to people is to not eat oily, roadside food, and they should not drink roadside cold juice. Also, a protein rich healthy diet like green vegetables, dairy products and fruits should be included in daily diet.