Doctors treat a 72-year-old with endovascular thrombectomy

An oral chemotherapy for lung cancer affected the speech of a 72-year-old woman. Doctors detected a clot in her brain and decide to remove the clot using a technique called ‘Endovascular Thrombectomy’. The treatment is routinely performed on patients with acute stroke caused due to a block in the cerebral arteries

Doctors treat a 72-year-old with Endovascular Thrombectomy

While undergoing oral chemotherapy for lung cancer on September 7, the speech of a 72-year-old woman started getting affected. Furthermore, she complained of severe weakness on the right side of her body.

She was then rushed to Hiranandani Hospital in Navi Mumbai. The doctors performed an MRI of the brain which revealed a complete blockage of main blood vessel i.e. the left internal carotid artery causing significant brain infarcts (strokes) and damage due to a lack of blood supply.

In a situation that required a quick treatment, she was taken in to the emergency room and she was detected with a clot. She was brought to the Emergency Department of Hiranandani Hospital.

Doctors were not able to administer this medicine as she had tendency to bleed which was caused due to low platelet count.

The doctors decided to remove the clot using a technique called ‘endovascular thrombectomy’. The treatment is routinely performed for patients with acute stroke caused due to block in the brain arteries.

If the procedure hadn’t been conducted, there was a high possibility of damage to entire left side of the brain resulting into severe swelling and higher risk of death due to complications.

A similar clot was found in the right leg artery which caused the patient intolerable pain and blackish discoloration of the right foot. A similar treatment was done on her right foot.

The patient had a difficult time coping with severe bodily weakness as her platelets were extremely low and had difficulty in breathing due to underlying pneumonia.

She underwent physiotherapy and was initially fed using a nasogastric tube. A magnetic stimulation device was used to treat residual spasticity and fastened the recovery.

Dr Pawan Ojha, consultant neurologist and stroke specialist at Hiranandani Hospital, Fortis network of hospitals, who conducted the procedure, said, “The patient has responded well to the procedure and the overall treatment. She is improving. Her feeding tube has been removed. She is able to use her limbs fully and is able to talk, walk and eat by herself and is currently visiting the hospital for follow-ups. There are practically no residual symptoms of stroke now.”