Biomedical students develop innovative injection for kids 

 An innovative injection, or rather ‘funjection,’ is a new spin on traditional injections. This device is designed in such a way that a syringe of the injection is covered with a toy and children are then deceived while they are being injected

Pune Biomedical students develop Innovative injection for kids

At a recently held Medical Device Innovation Camp (MEDIC) in Pune an innovative device named as ‘funjection’ caught the attention of all. It is a devised made by a team of students and professor which will help in nullifying the pain of injection for children.

The device is designed in such a way that a syringe of the injection is covered with a toy and children are then deceived while they are being injected. The team will soon start with market research and feasibility of launching such product in the market.

Pune Biomedical students develop Innovative injection for kids

Rajesh Pansare, associate professor at K J Somaiya college of engineering, who was one of the team mates in the team of four people, said, “When child sees a needle he gets scared. Next time even before visiting the doctor the child starts crying and the drama begins. In order to avoid that it is important to deceive the child. If the injection is hidden in some joy, there will not be any fear in the child’s mind. This is the concept behind this injection.”

The MEDIC was arranged in the last week at College of Engineering Pune (COEP) in association with VNIT Nagpur and IIT Bombay under the program called Biomedical Engineering Technology Incubation Centre (BETIC). Different prototype models were created by around 60 students and professors who had participated in the program.

Pune Biomedical students develop Innovative injection for kids

Dr Ajay Chandanwale, dean of B J Medical College, Pune, said, “These kinds of prototypes helps in creating alternate technology available in our country. More and more such technology is developed in our country, less are we made dependent on foreign countries for costly imports.”

Rohan Agarwal, working with a start-up in medical diagnostic, said, “We have not yet started with the market research for this product. If we found good market, we might go for market launch of the prototype.”

Aditi Patade, a biomedical engineering student, said, “These kinds of conferences help us to think creatively. As the syringe is hidden inside the toy is becomes easy for the doctor to inject. Sometimes complex problems can be tackled with simple solution.”