Bangladeshi’s heart gets back to normalcy after 8 years

A 62-year-old Bangladeshi is leading a normal life after an implantable loop recorder has been fixed in him to monitor his heart. The device will record the patient’s heart rhythm continuously similar to taking continuous ECGs. Any abnormal rhythm will be immediately sent to the concerned doctor as a mobile alert and the doctor can view the abnormal rhythm online

Bangladeshi’s heart gets back to normalcy after 8 years

Since the year 2010, Tofazzal Hossain started suffering from syncope, a condition that is characterised by sudden passing out or black out episodes. Today, Hossain, a 62-years-old Bangladesh citizen is leading a normal life.

These episodes occurred at any time of the day while Hossain did his daily chores and was followed by weakness for the next two-three days. Subsequently, he was thoroughly investigated at multiple centres and by many doctors in Bangladesh, but the exact cause of his syncopal episodes were not found.

The doctors were clueless about the exact reason behind these episodes and its cure. Over the next few months the frequency of the episodes increased, and hence the patient decided to visit a higher cardiac centre in India.

Hossain came to Nanavati Super Speciality Hospital who reviewed his previous reports and arrived at the conclusion that the patient will require continuous monitoring of his heart rhythm. This continuous monitoring will help him record his cardiac rhythm at the time of the syncopal event and will help in diagnosis and treatment.

The patient was advised to insert the implantable loop recorder that will help track his ECG 24/7 for the next 3 years.

Dr Salil Shirodkar, Interventional Cardiologist- Nanavati Super Speciality Hospital said, “An implantable loop recorder which is a very small device was inserted under the skin of the chest wall under local anaesthesia. The device will be helping us to monitor his condition while he is away in Bangladesh. The device will record the patient’s heart rhythm continuously similar to taking continuous ECGs. Any abnormal rhythm will be immediately sent to the concerned doctor as a mobile alert and the doctor can view the abnormal rhythm online. This kind of technology has enabled us to treat patients across countries.”