After a month-long fight, brave bro-sis duo discharged

After a month long struggle at the hospital in Pune, brother-sister who met with an accident, were discharged last month. Around 150 patients’ relatives had gathered in front of the hospital. Doctors at the hospital explained the patient’s relatives about the criticality of the case. Post-surgery precautions were taken to prevent infections to both of them

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Sameer Patil (25) and Pooja Patil (21) (names changed) met with an accident and suffered severe brain injuries. Sameer’s face and head was completely disfigured. There were multiple skin tears through which the fractured cranial bones were projecting out.

Dr Pravin Survashe, consultant neurosurgeon, at Colombia Asia Hospital in Kharadi, who operated on the patients, while explaining about Sameer’s condition when he was brought to the hospital after accident, said, “The damaged brain was actually pouting out through the fractured skull bones and nose also. However the good thing was both his pupils were still reacting normally. Damaged part of brain started emerging out through the skull defect and nose.”

“Pooja was unconscious and required ventilator support. She had few lacerated wounds over the head. Her external injuries were not that significant, however I was surprised to see at, her one pupil was completely dilated, not reacting to light at all. The other pupil was reacting normally hence I checked out her CT scan. The scan was showing multiple brain contusions (hemorrhages) on both the sides; however the biggest problem was the bleeding   which she had at the brainstem. Brainstem is an area which governs respiration, cardiac activities etc. and is the most important part of the brain,” he added while explaining about Pooja’s condition.

Around 150 patients’ relatives had gathered in front of the hospital. Survashe’s father also spend entire night at the hospital, as he wanted to protect his doctor son, as he feared that the patients relatives might go violent if the patients would be unable be saved.

Doctors at the hospital explained the patient’s relatives about the criticality of the case. When they could show hopes about Sameer’s recovery, they were not able to convince the family on Pooja’s recovery.

Survashe said, “When there are multiple cases to be operated simultaneously, a good rule of thumb is to save the salvageable person first. Hence, I decided to take the boy first for the surgery.”

While explaining about criticality in Pooja’s surgery, he said, “Neurosurgery is a branch where you have to think about last step of surgery, when you are operating the first step. If you fail to plan, you will plan to fail. This surgery was also difficult as we were supposed to operate on both the sides of brain. So we started operating on both sides simultaneously. The surgery that began latenight got over at 7:00 am.

Post-surgery, precautions were taken to prevent infections to both of them. When Sameer’s condition started improving slowly, Pooja could not recover soon. Even after 4 to 5 days Pooja’s response was not satisfactory. She used to open her eyes or move her limbs sometimes. However, there was no spontaneous respiration. Doctors said that all the breaths were provided by ventilator. Even if she survives there were chances that she might have become ventilator dependent for lifetime. The doctors then referred her to a nearby oxygen therapy centre. After almost 10 days of treatment there she started improving.

While explaining about the day of discharge, Survashe said, “I could not believe my eyes .She was sitting next to me. She waved her hand at me. She could recognise me. She was uttering some disarticulated words saying my name Pra..vin.. sir, what else you want from your patient?”

Arvind Patil, (name changed), Sameer and Pooja’s father, said, “When I heard the news that my children have met with an accident, I felt unconscious and I was hospitalised. Now, when I see them recovered, I know that it is doctors who have given life to my children.”